Public Programs: Summer 2013
Rodin

Friday, July 12, 2013 - Saturday, July 13, 2013

Friday, July 12, 6:30-9:30pm
Saturday, July 13, 9:30 am-5:30pm with lunch break 12-1:30 pm

At Goethe-Institut, 5750 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 100

A Psychological Perspectives Conference
AGING AND INDIVIDUATION

Presented by Michael Carbine, Lionel Corbett, Elizabeth Cook, Sondra Geller, Alden Josey, Christine Picchi, Cydny Rothe

Conference introduced by Barry Miller, Ph.D.

Friday Programs, 6:30-9:30pm

Lionel CorbettSuccessful Aging:
Jungian Contributions to the Development in Later Life

Lionel Corbett, M.D.
While aging is an individual experience, it also occurs in the context of a culture which is often deeply ambivalent about the value of aging. One of Jung's primary contributions was his understanding of the importance of the second half of life as a time of psychological and spiritual growth, as well as creativity. This presentation will explore some of the aspects of successful aging and personality development later in life, from a personal as well as an archetypal perspective.

Lionel Corbett, M.D., teaches at Pacific Graduate Institute, where he founded the Psyche and the Sacred program which integrates spirituality with depth psychology. In addition to studying various spiritual disciplines including Christian and Jewish mysticism, Buddhism, Advaita Vedanta, and Yoga, he has had a personal meditation practice for 20 years. A researcher in the biochemistry of the brain, Dr. Corbett started one of the first programs in the psychology of aging, and served as a hospital medical director of in-patient psychiatry. He also helped found a training program for Jungian analysts in Santa Fe, while teaching psychiatry at the University of New Mexico and maintaining a private practice. Author of 5 books, several training films, and numerous papers, he is also a Member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and served as a military physician in England.

Cydny RotheMusings on Death
Cydny Rothe, L.C.S.W., B.C.D.
The willingness to engage with life and the ability to maintain a sense of purpose alongside the certainty and mystery of death allow the individual to maintain an inner sense of vitality in the presence of the aging process. Drawing from clinical examples and amplifying through the process of the visual arts, we will examine some of the attitudes that inform death and aging, The way in which we consciously approach the end of life can also offer the opportunity for new beginnings.

Cydny Rothe, L.C.S.W., B.C.D., is a Jungian analyst in Pasadena, California and is a member analyst of the CG Jung Institute of Los Angeles where she serves on the Institute Board of Directors, the Certifying Board and as faculty. She gives talks and workshops on writing, film, dreams and the group unconscious. Cydny also serves on the Board of GREX (latin for flock), the West coast affiliate of AKRI, the A.K. Rice Institute for the Study of Groups, an organization that studies the impact of the unconscious on groups and organizations.

Course Objectives for Friday Evening:

  • Describe Jung's views on aging
  • Give 2 examples of successful aging
  • Give an example of how one can hold the tension of the opposites of inner vitality in the face of death and aging
  • Describe how art can inform our understanding of the symbolic nature of the aging process

Saturday Programs, 9:30am-12:00pm with Lunch Break 12-1:30pm

Alden JoseyThe Last Renaissance:
Individuation in the Ages 70-90

Alden Josey, Ph.D.
While the physical body inevitably declines, the progress of the soul can continue essentially unabated, with a constantly renewed invitation to discover new experiences of rebirth and renewal. Using clinical examples, we will examine the ways in which the birth of the soul continues through old age. Using Jung's idea of individuation as our model, we will examine some of the things which hinder versus support this process.

Alden Josey, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst trained in Zurich, in private practice in Wilmington, Delaware. He teaches at Jungian institutes in Philadelphia, New York, and Zurich, and lectures throughout the United States and abroad. Prior to his work as an analyst, he worked in research and research management in organic chemistry for 27 years at the DuPont Company.

Alice O. HowellAlice O. Howell: Jung and Aging
Sondra Geller, M.A., A.T.R.-B.C., L.P.C.
A short film interview of Alice O. Howell will be projected, followed by Sondra Geller’s reading of Alice Howell’s paper Jung and Aging.

Sondra Geller, M.A., A.T.R.-B.C., L.P.C., is a Jungian Analyst, Board Certified Art Therapist and Licensed Professional Counselor in private practice in Chevy Chase, MD. She lectures and gives workshops for the George Washington University Art Therapy Master’s Program, the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts, PAJA, the Washington Jung Society and at the C.G. Jung Institute in Küsnacht, Switzerland. Her areas of interest include making art in the presence of the analyst, Jung and aging, and the creative process.

Lunch Break 12-1:30pm

Elizabeth CookThe Temenos of Palliative Care
Elizabeth Cook, M.A., B.C.C., L.M.F.T.
and Christine Picchi, M.A., B.C.C.

Jung’s beliefs regarding the goal of the second half of life offer a rich psychological framework for understanding palliative care as an essential and integrated approach for persons living with serious illness. Palliative care, an interdisciplinary team approach to person-centered family care, integrates physical, psychological, social and spiritual dimensions of care and is appropriate at any stage in a serious illness, often provided in tandem with life-prolonging therapies. Just as the analyst seeks to Christine Picchicreate an alchemical vessel with the patient, in service to the psyche, palliative care teams form a temenos, a safe protected container for patients and families. By listening intently to the patient’s lived experience, beliefs and values, palliative care professionals strive to honor patients’ goals, relieve physical and spiritual suffering and sustain hope throughout the course of illness. Each encounter is an opportunity for healing and transformation, even when cure is not possible. Through art, dreams, stories and music, the presenters will reflect upon the temenos of palliative care.

Elizabeth Cook, M.A., B.C.C., L.M.F.T., Jungian Analyst, completed analytical training at C.G. Jung Study Center of Southern California and currently practices in Portland, Oregon. Previously, she was a Clinical Pastoral Education supervisor, and also served as a senior chaplain specializing in palliative care.

Christine Picchi, M.A., B.C.C., is the Executive Director of the Supportive Care Coalition, a national coalition of Catholic health care organizations, advancing excellence in palliative care. A board certified chaplain, she has extensive health care experience in directing spiritual care, mission integration and palliative care programs.

Sondra GellerSparking the Creative Life in Older Adults
Sondra Geller, M.A., A.T.R.-B.C.,
This presentation will describe the process of using art therapy with older adults, comparing two different populations. The first were primarily Holocaust survivors at a home for the aged, and the art provided a non-verbal means of communicating profound and often hidden feelings. A dominant theme was loss: loss of family in the War, of loved ones from illness, of personal strength, independence, and a sense of self. The second was the use of art, in addition to dance/movement, poetry, mime, and active imagination, with a one hundred years old artist, who in spite of failing eyesight, was able to collaborate with other artists, seeing with her hands and creating images from her mind's eye.

Sondra Geller, M.A., A.T.R.-B.C., L.P.C., is a Jungian Analyst, Board Certified Art Therapist and Licensed Professional Counselor in private practice in Chevy Chase, MD. She lectures and gives workshops for the George Washington University Art Therapy Master’s Program, the Philadelphia Association of Jungian Analysts, PAJA, the Washington Jung Society and at the C.G. Jung Institute in Küsnacht, Switzerland. Her areas of interest include making art in the presence of the analyst, Jung and aging, and the creative process.

Michael CarbineJung and Aging:
Bringing to Life the Possibilities for Vibrant Aging

Michael Carbine, M.A.
This presentation will bring specific Jungian ideas about late-life psychological and spiritual growth that would be of interest and value to those working with aging adults (as well as aging adults themselves).

Michael Carbine, M.A., was co-producer of the March 2012 Symposium entitled Jung and Aging: Bringing to Life the Possibilities for Vibrant Aging, sponsored by the Library of Congress and the Jung Society of Washington. He is a contributor to and co-editor of a forthcoming book of the same title. He currently is working on a second book based on interviews with Jungian analysts about their experience with the aging process.

Panel Discussion with participation from the speakers
Moderated by Michael Carbine, M.A.


Course Objectives:

  • Describe what is different about the individuation process in the ages between 70 and 90
  • Give an example of what supports and what hinders individuation in old age
  • List some similarities between the temenos of palilative care and the temenos of analytic work
  • Give an example of how the creative arts can be used as a means of psychological integration in palliative care
  • Describe how art therapy can be utilized in an elderly population who has experienced trauma
  • Describe how art therapy can be integrated with analytic work with an elderly population

Pre-registered: $200.00 | At Door: $200.00
Continuing Education: 9 CE credits available, see Continuing Education page
Location: Goethe-Institut, 5750 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA 90036

Note: Parking $1.00 at 5750 Wilshire Courtyard East und Westbldg. AFTER 6 pm Friday and all day Saturday with validation. Some street parking available south of the Goethe Institute. Please read the street signs to confirm.

Pre-registration (recommended) until 5:00pm of the lecture day for evening lectures; or Friday, 5:00pm for week-end workshops. At Door fee applies after.